2008-02-28

* Big Kids Dodgeball

(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) EYE ON THE PRIZE / Paul Naddaff, founder of Big Kids Dodgeball, challenges the 10 teams competing at the February tournament held at Basketball City to play hard to win the three-foot trophy prize. After being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" to start BKD four years ago, Naddaff's recreational fun has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) LET THE GAMES BEGIN / Paul Naddaff, founder of Big Kids Dodgeball, calls out the first round of matches for the 10 teams competing at the February tournament held at Basketball City. After being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" to start BKD four years ago, Naddaff's recreational fun has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) HIPPO HYPE / Scott Whiting, Jon Whiting, and Sara Sakamoto (from left), members of team Hippopotami, get ready to fight for balls at center court during their first round game at the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) BATTLE FOR BOSTON / Paul Naddaff, founder of Big Kids Dodgeball, watches over one of the final games of the 10 teams competing at the February tournament held at Basketball City. After being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" to start BKD four years ago, Naddaff's recreational fun has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) BATTLE FOR THE BALLS / Two teams fight for balls at center court during their first round game at the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) FAITHFUL FANS / Tori Siciliano, Ashli Mooney, and Jaymie Medugno (from left), high schoolers from Billerica, watch their boyfriends and members of the Supa Dupa Fun Brigade warm up during the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) SERIOUS SPECTATORS / High schoolers from Billerica intently watch their friends on Team Flow compete during the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. Team Flow, the defending champions of the January tournament lost their title to BANF, from Wilmington. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) Referees Chris Landault (foreground) and Tim Choate (background) are challenged by team Hood on a call during a game at the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) THREE'S COMPANY / Jared Waite (right), captain of BANF from Wilmington, hides behind two teammates in a stacking strategy used during a game at the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. BANF went on to take the title from defending champions Team Flow, from Billerica. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) HUSTLE AND FLOW / As a fellow player jumps on his back, Team Flow member Wayne Bolz, from Billerica, celebrates a victory during a round at the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. Team Flow, the defending champions of the January tournament lost their title to BANF, from Wilmington. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) ROCKET READY / Two players fire rockets at their opponents during a round at the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) Joe Kasirye, official tournament scorekeeper, takes a photo during a round at the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) FEBRUARY MAKES FIVE / Jared Waite (center), captain of BANF from Wilmington, celebrates his fifth tournament win with his teammates during the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. BANF took the title from defending champions Team Flow, from Billerica. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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(February 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) TROPHY TRIUMPH / Team BANF, from Wilmington, celebrates their fifth tournament win of the three-foot trophy during the Big Kids Dodgeball February tournament held at Basketball City. BANF took the title from defending champions Team Flow, from Billerica. During the winter, 10 teams of seven players compete for a three-foot trophy, amongst other prizes, while during the summer, 22 teams of 10 players compete for bragging rights. BKD began four years ago by Paul Naddaff after being inspired by the Hollywood film "Dodgeball" and has since grown into a database of almost 500 teams of 10 people with monthly tournaments in Boston and newly established Syracuse, NY, and sponsors that include PUMA, Vitamin Water, and WBCN radio. (Photo by Whitney J. Fox)
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2008-02-21

* the PERFECT JUMP

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2008-02-08

* Josh Holbrook, Bike Messenger

(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) MESSENGER MISSION - Josh Holbrook found his calling as a bike messenger in Boston. / After making a delivery to 84 State Street, Josh Holbrook, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, puts on his head phones to listen to music while riding to his next job during a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning. Holbrook, 20, moved to Boston from Orlando two years ago with the intent on being a bike messenger and he loves it, although he admits his first winter here wasn't easy. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) MESSENGER MISSION - Josh Holbrook found his calling as a bike messenger in Boston. / After making a delivery to 84 State Street, Josh Holbrook, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, puts on his head phones to listen to music while riding to his next job during a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning. Holbrook, 20, moved to Boston from Orlando two years ago with the intent on being a bike messenger and he loves it, although he admits his first winter here wasn't easy. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) SUIT SWINGING - Bike messenger Josh Holbrook stops at 1 State Street to hand-off a delivery to a co-worker. / On a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning in Boston, Josh Holbrook, 20, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, sees a co-worker while swinging his next delivery, a men's suit. He smiles as he sees his co-worker arriving to meet him at 1 State Street. Holbrook moved to Boston from Orlando two years ago with the intent on being a bike messenger and he loves it, although he admits his first winter here wasn't easy. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) THE HAND-OFF - Josh Holbrook hands off a delivery for fellow bike messenger Eric Perkins on State Street in Boston. / Josh Holbrook (left), 20, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, hands off a letter for co-worker Eric Perkins (right), 25, to deliver during a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning. Holbrook moved to Boston from Orlando two years ago with the intent on being a bike messenger and he loves it, although he admits his first winter here wasn't easy. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. The two co-workers share an apartment together in Roxbury.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) MESSENGER MOMENT - Bike messenger Josh Holbrook chats with a co-worker at 1 State Street. / On a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning in Boston, Josh Holbrook (left), 20, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, chats with co-worker Eric Perkins (right), 25, at 1 State Street. Holbrook moved to Boston from Orlando two years ago with the intent on being a bike messenger and he loves it, although he admits his first winter here wasn't easy. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. The two co-workers share an apartment together in Roxbury.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) RIDING RADIO WAVES - Bike messenger Josh Holbrook rides down Milk Street to his next delivery. / Josh Holbrook, 20, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, listens to music on hi head phones as he rides down Milk Street to his next delivery on a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning. Holbrook moved to Boston from Orlando two years ago with the intent on being a bike messenger and he loves it, although he admits his first winter here wasn't easy. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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* Eric Perkins, Bike Messenger

(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) JOTTING JOBS - Bike messenger Eric Perkins jots down his next jobs. / Eric Perkins, 25, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, jots down his next jobs to deliver on a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning in downtown Boston. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) WEATHER WOES - Bike messenger Eric Perkins peers up at the sky that is dropping cold, wet snow. / Eric Perkins, 25, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, peers up at the cloudy sky that is dropping cold, wet snow while he works on Friday morning in Boston. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) PEDAL PUSHER - Bike messenger Eric Perkins hops off his ride at 1 State Street. / Eric Perkins, 25, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, hops off his ride at 1 State Street on a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning in Boston. He is meeting a co-worker to pick up the package for his next delivery. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) THE HAND-OFF - Josh Holbrook hands off a delivery for fellow bike messenger Eric Perkins on State Street in Boston. / Josh Holbrook (left), 20, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, hands off a letter for co-worker Eric Perkins (right), 25, to deliver during a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning. Holbrook moved to Boston from Orlando two years ago with the intent on being a bike messenger and he loves it, although he admits his first winter here wasn't easy. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. The two co-workers share an apartment together in Roxbury.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) LOFTY LAUGHS - Bike messenger Eric Perkins stops at 1 State Street to finish paper work for his next delivery. / On a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning in Boston, Eric Perkins, 25, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, rests his ride at 1 State Street to finish paper work for his next delivery. He laughs at comments being made over the two-way radios that each of his co-workers carry while riding. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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(February 8, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) THE BEST JOB - Bike messenger Eric Perkins pedals to his next delivery. / On a cold, wet-snowy, Friday morning in Boston, Eric Perkins, 25, a bike messenger for Marathon Courier, pedals down the sidewalk after just dropping off a delivery to an office building on State Street. He and other bike messengers typically ride on the street, only occasionally pedaling on the sidewalk. Perkins, who hails from York, Maine and is now in his fourth winter with Marathon, says being a bike messenger fulfills him on a daily basis. He now shares an apartment in Roxbury with a fellow bike messenger from his company.
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2008-02-02

* Black Library Booksellers

(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) GHETTO NATION - A book titled "Ghetto Nation" waits to be stocked on the shelves of The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) GHETTO NATION - A book titled "Ghetto Nation" waits to be stocked on the shelves of The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) BOOKS AMASS - Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. takes inventory of the hundreds of books on his push cart that amass to form The Black Library Booksellers located at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Hart says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." He hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) PATRON LOYALTY - Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. (right), owner of The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing, helps Christine Brown (left), a patron for almost five years, as she browses the books. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Quite often Hart orders books for customers if he does not have it in stock. He says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) COEXISTENCE - African American fiction and non-fiction books coexist on display at The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) BOOKS BIDE THEIR TIME - The book shelves of The Black Library Booksellers push cart overlook a group of African American teenage boys on Washington Street at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) A REAL BOOKSTORE - Leane Villafane (left) and Nahjah Prescott (right), both juniors at the Engineering School in Hyde Park, browse the books at The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. Prescott, who has been a patron since ninth grade, says, "This is a real bookstore." The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(January 28, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) TEEN HEED - Leane Villafane, a junior at the Engineering School in Hyde Park, browses books at The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(February 2, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) FAMILY TIES - George Smith (left) and his sister Frances Murray (right), from Wellesley, who were shopping with their mother, browse books at The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. Smith, who ended up purchasing a book on Martin Luther King, Jr., is a biracial African American Jew whose family strives to read literature about his heritage. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(February 2, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) BEVY OF BOOKS - African American non-fiction books on display at The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(February 2, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) AT YOUR SERVICE - Marquse Mathis, employee of The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing, writes his phone number on the back of a business card for a patron who is placing an order for a book. The Black Library, which is black-owned and only sells black literature, quite often orders books for customers if they do not have it in stock. Mathis, who enjoys interacting with customers, declares, "Books - they bring people together." Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(February 2, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) HOMETOWN HOLLER - Massiel Nunez browses books at The Black Library Booksellers push cart located at Downtown Crossing. Nunez, who says she used to have to go to New York City to find the books she enjoys reading, now shops in her own city of Boston. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Owner Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." Hart hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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(February 2, 2008 - BOSTON, MA) BOOKS AMASS - Lloyd E. Hart, Jr. takes inventory of the hundreds of books on his push cart that amass to form The Black Library Booksellers located at Downtown Crossing. The Black Library is black-owned and only sells black literature. Hart says, "We're the only black booksellers in Boston and it's been that way for the past 10 or 15 years." He hopes to use his library to "perpetuate the love of reading" in African Americans.
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